Showing posts with label EnCase Forensic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label EnCase Forensic. Show all posts

Fear and Loathing in Internet History

James Habben

As a DFIR examiner, poring over internet history records is a well-loathed daily activity. We spend hours looking at these lists trying to find an interesting URL that moves our case one direction or another. Sometimes we can use a filtering mechanism to remove URLs that we know for certain are uninteresting, but keeping a list like this up to date is a manual task. I used Websense to assist with this type of work at my previous job, but I have also had brief experiences with Blue Coat. as well.

Feature Spotlight: Report Template Wizard

Ken Mizota

No forensic investigation is complete without a comprehensive report tailored to the intended audience. Whether the cases involve crime, civil litigation, or policy non-compliance, the end goal of an investigation is to share findings with others. EnCase Version 7 provides powerful tools to efficiently incorporate the findings of the investigation into a Report Template. While powerful, Report Templates can have a steep learning curve, and particularly in time-sensitive investigations, simplicity may be more desirable than power.

EnCase Version 7.10 adds the Report Template Wizard. You can quickly add a Bookmark Folder to the Report Template, specify metadata, perform basic formatting, and preview the report. The Report Template Wizard simplifies reporting while maintaining the power of Report Templates. Read on beyond the jump to learn more.

Feature Spotlight: Portable Triage

Ken Mizota

EnCase 7.10 now includes full EnCase Portable capabilities at no additional cost.

In this post, I’ll explain what this means to the investigator and show some practical tips on how to make use of your new-found ability. Acquire Live RAM? Detect encryption? Perform snapshot? Capture screenshots of running Windows? Learn more after the jump.

Feature Spotlight: SED Unlock with EnCase & WinMagic SecureDoc

Ken Mizota

Self-encrypting drives represent a very specific problem for digital investigators. The direction of technology is clear: within the next few years, strong encryption will be baked into the silicon of every hard drive from every major manufacturer. Self-encrypting drives (SED) offer greater data security than traditional full-disk encryption in that the data stored is always encrypted at rest and the keys to decrypt the data never leave the device, which means they cannot be practically brute-forced through traditional means.

SEDs render “cold boot” and “evil maid” attacks useless and offer instant encryption and crypto-erase when a drive needs to be repurposed. SEDs are very attractive, but present significant obstacles to traditional disk-based forensics. In this post, we’ll walk through how EnCase 7.10 works with WinMagic SecureDoc to enable forensic investigation of self-encrypting drives.

Case Study: Chesterfield County Police Department

Cynthia Siemens


Many digital investigators in law enforcement work for multiple teams and agencies. Keith Vincent is no exception. In his current role in the Economic Crimes Unit of the Chesterfield County Police Department, his title is Detective. In his earlier work as a deputized U.S. Marshal for the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Child Exploitation Task Force, he was the Task Force Officer, and in his work with Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC), he served as ICAC representative for his agency.

So many artifacts, so little time… Summer edition

Ken Mizota

EnCase is an extensible digital investigation platform. Simply put, extensibility reduces time and effort for the investigator. One way to validate this claim for yourself is to take a look at the depth and breadth of the ways EnCase can work with existing tools in your kit. For example: Do you already own Magnet Forensic's IEF? IEF and EnCase work together to reduce work for investigators. Have you considered how to integrate threat intelligence into your DFIR regimen? EnCase and Cisco Security (formerly ThreatGRID) collaborate to reduce IR time and effort. Let’s walk through a few ways extensibility works in your favor.