Showing posts with label Training. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Training. Show all posts

Forensic Focus Review: Guidance Software EnCase Training Computer Forensics I Course in Slough, U.K.

Scar de Courcier

During the first week of December 2014, Guidance Software ran a computer forensics training course at its Slough offices in the UK, with the aim of helping forensic practitioners to understand and use EnCase as part of their investigations. 


The course was developed by Guidance Software with a view to introducing new digital forensics practitioners to the field. The students are usually new IT security professionals, law enforcement agents and forensic investigators, and many have minimal training in computing.  Computer Forensics I is available both in person at one of Guidance Software's training centres, or online via their OnDemand solution, which provides live remote classes for students around the world.

Fear and Loathing in Internet History

James Habben

As a DFIR examiner, poring over internet history records is a well-loathed daily activity. We spend hours looking at these lists trying to find an interesting URL that moves our case one direction or another. Sometimes we can use a filtering mechanism to remove URLs that we know for certain are uninteresting, but keeping a list like this up to date is a manual task. I used Websense to assist with this type of work at my previous job, but I have also had brief experiences with Blue Coat. as well.

POSIX Regular Expressions in EnScript and .NET

James Habben

I am sure you have spent a little intimate time with EnCase doing keyword searches, so you know that EnCase has basic GREP capabilities. This is a powerful feature that allows for searches to be performed with patterns that can eliminate false positive hits. Recently, we hosted a webinar with guest Suzanne Widup, describing some techniques and benefits of using GREP in EnCase.

GREP is a term that comes from the Unix world long ago. It stands for Globally search for Regular Expressions and Print. This command line utility was used to search through data and print out results that matched the given pattern. Because of the popularity of the tool, the name has become synonymous with Regular Expressions (Regex). Though there is a defined standard, POSIX, the syntax of patterns used in Regex actually varies quite wildly depending on the platform engine and programming language that is being used. EnCase is no exception. In homage to our habit of prefixing our product names with “En”, I jokingly refer to our syntax of regex as “EnGrep.”

Poweliks: Persistent Malware Living Only in the Registry? Impossible!

James Habben

The ultimate desire for malware authors is to be able to have their code run every time a computer starts, and leave no trace on the disk for us to find. Let me reassure you that it hasn’t happened just yet, at least not that I have seen. There have been plenty of examples over the years that have taken advantage of some clever techniques that disguise their disk-based homes, but that’s just it–disguise!

A couple of recent posts on “Poweliks” here and here shed light on creative measures attackers use to store malware in the Windows Registry. In short, there is a registry value that executes an encoded script stored in another registry value, which then drops a file on disk for execution.

Working with EnScript and .NET/C#

Ken Mizota

The ability to manipulate and interpret data structures within evidence has long been a strength of EnCase. EnScript—a core EnCase technology—has enabled investigators and incident responders to be efficient, automating the most sophisticated or mind-numbingly rote techniques. For instance, take Simon Key's (@SimonDCKey) recent post on the OS X Quick Look Thumbnail Cache: the ability to mine, extract and work with critical data for your case is available now. This app, courtesy of Guidance Software Training, just happens to be free, enabling the DFIR community to take advantage. If you need to keep pace with the perpetually accelerating gap between data and the investigator’s ability to understand that data, having extensible, flexible tools in your kit is not optional.